AST 2014 - Cutting Edge of Transplantation

Feb 13, 2014 ‐ Feb 15, 2014


The Cutting Edge of Transplantation 2014 (February 13-15 in Chandler, AZ) is an exciting and ambitious meeting that will tackle the problem of long-term survival, one of the most difficult problems we face in organ transplantation. The meeting will focus on better understanding the problem and what can be done about it through the emergence of new technology, targets and therapeutics. The areas include the new insights into the control of complement and antibody injury, personalized medicine using molecular diagnostics that is available today, new approaches to preventing organ injury at the time of transplant, paradigm shifts in concepts about cell death and fibrosis that will allow us to prevent premature failure of transplants, the role microbes have in shaping outcomes, and others.

The 2013 CEOT meeting was immensely successful in joining basic, translational, and clinical experts in an intimate environment. The 2014 CEOT meeting will once again bring together a wide range of transplant professionals in a small-meeting setting. Speakers will present material that is cutting edge but also critically relevant to what is already happening in the lab and in the clinic. It’s subject matter you need to know now in order to be at the forefront of transplantation.

The interactive format aims to propel the field forward by generating comprehensive understanding and new collaborative interactions. This meeting is specifically designed to maximize discussion and communication between speakers and attendees and will be exceptionally valuable to all levels of experience and expertise. This meeting offers opportunities for networking that you just can’t get at larger meetings. The educational design of this activity addressses the needs of healthcare professionals and researchers working in the field of transplantation medicine.

Standard: Free

Sessions

Welcome Remarks: Why Are We Here, and What Do We Hope to Accomplish?

Feb 13, 2014 5:00pm ‐ Feb 13, 2014 5:10pm

Identification: TH01a

Speaker(s):

Where Will New Therapeutics Come From: Academia or Pharma?

Feb 13, 2014 5:10pm ‐ Feb 13, 2014 5:40pm

Identification: TH01b

Since the mortality rates five years after many solid organ transplants are similar to the mortality rates five years after the first diagnosis of many common cancers, new therapeutic strategies for transplant recipients are desperately needed. While academia continues to produce the basic knowledge required to discover and develop more effective, safer and more cost-effective therapeutics, industry and academia must work together to conduct the clinical trials required for regulatory approval of improved therapeutics. Despite the current unmet clinical need for improved therapeutics, there is a gap in needed expertise and new approaches between where basic science ends and where later stages of clinical trial development begin. Solutions to bridge this gap will be proposed suggesting that the answer to the question is that academia, industry as well as new organizations that bridge this gap are all needed for the creation of new therapeutics.

Speaker(s):
  • Randy Morris, MD, FRCP, Stanford University School of Medicine

Enhancing Long-term Survival: How Probing the Fundamental Mechanisms of Rejection Can Help

Feb 13, 2014 5:40pm ‐ Feb 13, 2014 6:10pm

Identification: TH01c

A principal aim of research in transplantation is to develop strategies that enhance allograft outcomes with minimal cost (side-effects) to patients. Basic scientists can help achieve this goal by probing the fundamental mechanisms of rejection. In this lecture, vignettes from both innate and adaptive immunity will be presented to illustrate this point and a provocative appeal for a return to fundamental, hypothesis-testing science in transplantation will be put forth.

Speaker(s):

Provocative Panel DiscussionProvocative Panel Discussion

Preview Available

Provocative Panel Discussion

Feb 13, 2014 6:40pm ‐ Feb 13, 2014 7:30pm

Identification: TH01e


Disrupting Old Concepts of Cell Death: Implications for Modifying Organ Preservation at the Molecular Level

Feb 14, 2014 8:45am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 9:15am

Identification: FR01d

Traditional views of cell death include programmed apoptosis and uncontrolled necrosis. It appears now that both are programmed and have emerging therapeutics, and that caspase-8 – which is involved in apoptosis – may function primarily to control necrosis. The implications for transplantation are tremendous, as organ injury is invariably caused by the procurement and storage procedure, and intervention without understanding the complex biology will have unintended complications.

Speaker(s):

Ex Vivo Normothermic Liver Perfusion: 'Warming' Old Paradigms in Organ Preservation

Feb 14, 2014 9:15am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 9:45am

Identification: FR01e

Our approach to organ preservation has been based on cold storage in buffer solutions, which can augment ischemia reperfusion injury. It may be time to change our views based on new basic and clinical research data. However, is this acceptable for all organs and can the lessons from liver be generalized? Dr. Friend will discuss the development of his exciting OrganOx system from animal models to first-in-human clinical trials currently being conducted at King’s College Hospital in London.

Speaker(s):

The Challenge of Translation: One Donor - Many Organs, Regulations and Policies

Feb 14, 2014 9:45am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 10:15am

Identification: FR01f

Interventions aimed at ameliorating early organ injury thereby improving early organ function face unique challenges in translation, including clinical trial design and the extreme challenge of conducting trials in DBD (and DCD) donors as injury begins in the deceased donor. However, the administration of novel agents to deceased donors is fraught with ethical, logistical, and regulatory barriers that obstruct innovation. There is a broad-based effort involving HRSA, AST, ASTS, AOPO, and other major multi-disciplinary stakeholders to identify, discuss, and potentially resolve the key barriers.

Speaker(s):
  • Sandy Feng, MD, PhD, Univ of California, San Francisco

Regulatory T Cells: Ready and Useful... or Lost in Translation?

Feb 14, 2014 10:30am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 11:00am

Identification: FR02a

Progress in terms of ex vivo preparation of Tregs including obtaining sufficient amplification; purity/activity has finally made this approach feasible. Trials in autoimmune disease (Bluestone), and approaches for trials in transplantation are underway, as well as in GVHD/BMT (Blazar). In non-lymphopenic settings such as transplantation, how can we deal with the effector response and tip the balance towards Tregs if most IS agents inhibit Tregs?

Speaker(s):

Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Are These the Stem Cells We Were Looking For?

Feb 14, 2014 11:00am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 11:30am

Identification: FR02b

After years of anecdotal reports, mesenchymal stem cells have been used in a sizeable randomized controlled trial and shown to improve early outcomes. In addition to decreasing rejection through anti-inflammatory effects, such cells may aid repair and reduce injury – improving initial function. New studies using these cells to treat subclinical rejection and reduce ischemia reperfusion injury are in progress.

Speaker(s):

The Changing Face of Complement: Targeting in the Absence of Antibody

Feb 14, 2014 11:30am ‐ Feb 14, 2014 12:00pm

Identification: FR02c

Complement is well-known to be involved in antibody-mediated injury. New studies have implicated complement in the function of both regulatory and effector T cells. The underlying basis of this activity and possible therapeutic applications will be discussed.

Speaker(s):
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